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Context and Intentions of the “Bergen Oromo Meeting”

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Read more...By Siegfried Pausewang

The Oromo are the largest single ethnic group in Ethiopia, constituting roughly one third of the population. They have managed admirably well to create a common feeling of belongingness during the last 30 or 40 years. Local clan- or community-based identities were forged into a strong common identity of “Oromumma”, an Oromo national identity. But precisely that made all other groups look at them with fear and suspiciousness: In a political context where ethnicity decides over political association, all other groups must fear that the Oromo, should they be able to challenge the present rulers, would establish yet another system of domination, as all predecessors had done.

At last, Minnesotan Oromos share their secrets

Who knows the Minnesota Oromo? Who knows their dark secret?

Fifteen thousand Oromo live in Minnesota but they blend in almost invisibly, like a stealthy, anonymous population in the state.

Their secret enshrouds them although they are our neighbors, who mix completely within us and who, in the last analysis, are indistinguishable from us.

They are teachers, doctors and lawyers; they run retail shops and corporations; they attend Viking games, relax at coffee shops and stroll at malls. They are sometimes called "Ethiopian immigrants" because they are indeed from Ethiopia. But among friends and family, or if you ask them specifically, they carefully call themselves "Oromo."

Saving the world's rarest wolf found only in Oromia

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Read more...By Jeremy Hance and Rhett Butler, Mongabay.com

Saving the Ethiopian wolf in face of habitat loss, diseased dogs, and climate change, an interview with Claudio Sillero-Zubiri, founder of the Ethiopian Wolf Conservation Programme.

 

Living on the roof of Africa, the Ethiopian wolf is one of the world's rarest carnivores, if not the rarest! Trapped on a few mountain islands rising over 4,000 meters above sea level on either/both sides of the Great Rift Valley, this unique canid has so far survived millennia of human-animal interactions in one of Africa's most densely populated rural lands. But the threat of climate change and a shifting agriculture frontier may require new conservation measures, according to Argentine-born Claudio Sillero, the world's foremost expert on the Ethiopian wolf, who has spent two decades championing this rare species.